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Roy Scranton is learning to stop worrying and love the academy in Princeton, New Jersey. His stories, essays, and reviews have been published in Boston Review, the New York Times, The AppendixLITTheory & Event, and elsewhere. He is one of the editors of Fire and Forget, published by Da Capo press in February 2013.

31 December 2009

Good Riddance 2009

The end of a particularly fucked year at the end of another low, dishonest decade.

Hard to know what to say. Some things are in order. First, my quotation from Cornel West was, I would hope obviously, taking the piss. The man gives narcissism a bad name. Second, read some books on trauma. Mm-hm. I could post the bibliography but, frankly, why? Props to Ian Hacking and Yuval Harari. Have started some other books which I'll talk about when I finish. Third, and finally, I saw A Serious Man, which was pretty awesome and has left me troubled.

Another rejection for the war novel and various stories and poems. Got a piece in New Letters and another forthcoming in Consequence. Tonight, this New Years' Eve, 2010 sounds like a good idea.

Happy New Year, everybody.

03 December 2009

Better Living Through Bacon

Soon all my vegetarian friends will be able to eat fake meat grown in a laboratory. Hooray for Frankenbacon! This will certainly solve all our problems. I'm thinking perhaps they can grow the marinade too, right in the meat.

If this actually worked, I wonder whether it would be an expensive niche item, like seitan, or a massive meat replacement, like the weird, rubbery chicken you get at Sammy's Noodle Shop on 6th Ave?

Also, apparently Cornel West's new book sucks. My favorite parts of this book are the suggestion that West needs to go out to the woodshed, which had a different meaning in the Army than it seems to have among Jazz musicians, and the following long quotation:
“The basic problem with my love relationships with women is that my standards are so high -- and they apply equally to both of us. I seek full-blast mutual intensity, fully fledged mutual acceptance, full-blown mutual flourishing, and fully felt peace and joy with each other. This requires a level of physical attraction, personal adoration, and moral admiration that is hard to find. And it shares a depth of trust and openness for a genuine soul-sharing with a mutual respect for a calling to each other and to others. Does such a woman exist for me? Only God knows and I eagerly await this divine unfolding. Like Heathcliff and Catherine’s relationship in Emily Bronte’s remarkable novel Wuthering Heights or Franz Schubert’s tempestuous piano Sonata No. 21 in B flat (D.960) I will not let life or death stand in the way of this sublime and funky love that I crave!”
And why would you? Go get that sublime and funky love.

And I meanwhile, will savor my sublime and funky love for soggy laboratory-grown pork. Mmmm.